Safety 1st Elite 80 Air + Review

Safety 1st Elite Air

“I want to buy the last seat I need for my 8 month old.”

This is a hopeful statement Child Passenger Safety Technicians often hear from parents, who become anything from confused to irritated when we try to explain there really isn’t any such thing.

Several companies have tried, with varying levels of success, to create the elusive 3-in-1.   Dorel makes various models of the Alpha Omega Elite, Evenflo makes the Symphony 65 and each Diono convertible is marketed with a booster mode of use.      All of those seats, while perfectly safe, have significant drawbacks.

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Dorel Juvenile Recalls Safety 1st and Eddie Bauer Car Seats

On September 12, 2013, Dorel annouced a recall of certain Safety 1st and Eddie Bauer car seats. The affected seats are mislabeled with the stickers notating the rear and forward facing belt paths reversed. This recall does not affect their crash performance, however the seats must be installed using the correct belt path. The models affected are manufactured from July 10, 2010 through May 18, 2011 and include Convertible child restraints Alpha Omega Elite, Deluxe 3 in 1, Complete Air LX and Complete Air SE with the following model numbers:

22187ANL, Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite
22187REM, Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite
22187REMA, Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite
22187SAR, Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite
22187SARA, Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite
22465FSM, Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite
22790CGT, Eddie Bauer Deluxe 3 in 1
CC033BMT, Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite
CC043ANK, Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite
CC043ANL, Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite
CC043AQS, Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite
CC046AAI, Eddie Bauer Deluxe 3 in 1
CC046AAU, Eddie Bauer Deluxe 3 in 1
CC046CTA, Eddie Bauer Deluxe 3 in 1
CC046SNW, Eddie Bauer Deluxe 3 in 1
CC046WPR, Eddie Bauer Deluxe 3 in 1
CC050AJH, Safety 1st Complete Air LX
CC050ANY, Safety 1st Complete Air LX
CC050ANZ, Safety 1st Complete Air LX
CC050AOQ, Safety 1st Complete Air LX
CC051AIR, Safety 1st Complete Air SE

If you own one of these seats, check that your seat is installed using the correct belt path, knowing it may be mislabeled. The rear facing belt path lies under the child’s legs, the closest opening to the vehicle seat back when rear facing. The forward facing belt path lies behind the child’s back, again the closest opening to the vehicle seat back when the child seat is placed forward facing. Then contact Dorel Juvenile for replacement stickers: call the Recall Hotline at 1-877-675-2355, Monday through Friday, 8AM to 5:00PM EST or email rfbaselabel@djgusa.com.

For further information, see the Dorel Juvenile Safety Notice here:

http://www.djgusa.com/usa/eng/Safety-Notices/Detail/556-Dorel-Juvenile-Announces-a-Safety-Recall-of-Certain-Safety-1st-and-Eddie-Bauer-Child-Restraint-Systems

Or the NHTSA notice here:

http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/owners/SearchResults?searchType=ID&targetCategory=R&searchCriteria.nhtsa_ids=11C002&refurl=email

The Alpha Omega: Why it’s neither the first, nor the last, nor the Elite car seat.

 

The Alpha Omega Elite. Utter those words to any Child Passenger Safety technician and then just wait for the sigh of frustration and the exasperated look on their face. Something about like this:

Alpha Omega, Alpha Elite, Eddie Bauer car seat, booster, hbb, Dorel, Cosco

 

First, a disclaimer: when used properly, the Alpha Omega Elite is absolutely just as safe as any other car seat. The key to that statement is “used properly,” and in this post we’re about to explore some of the reasons why this seat is difficult to use properly and why it elicits that exasperated sigh from CPSTs every time it shows up at a checkpoint.

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